Overactive Bladder | OAB - Oakdale ObGyn
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Services Overactive Bladder | OAB

Overactive bladder, or OAB, is a bladder-storage problem that leads to a sudden need or urge to go to the bathroom. “I’m not going to make it!” is pretty typical. The urge is often hard to control and may result in bladder leakage. Some women with OAB also need to go to the bathroom frequently. This treatable condition usually affects women 40 or older but younger women may also experience OAB. The likelihood of OAB increases as you get older.

Causes

OAB happens when your bladder muscles contract involuntarily, even if there isn’t a lot of urine in your bladder. These contractions make you feel that you need to use the bathroom immediately.

Sometimes the cause of OAB is never identified. However, there are some known health conditions, lifestyle behaviors, and risks that are associated with symptoms of OAB. They include:

  • Urinary tract infections
  • Constipation
  • Incomplete bladder emptying
  • Medications
  • Excessive alcohol or caffeine intake
  • High urine production, which might occur with kidney problems or diabetes
  • Bladder tumors or stones
  • Neurological disorders, such as stroke or multiple sclerosis
  • Cognitive function problems associated with dementia or Alzheimer’s

Common Symptoms

Common OAB symptoms can include:

  • Feeling a sudden urge to use the bathroom (and that you might not make it)
  • Bladder leaking (urge incontinence)
  • Getting up 2 or more times at night to use the bathroom
  • Going to the bathroom 8 or more times in 24 hours

At the Center for Urinary and Pelvic Health, we diagnose OAB in several ways. You will be asked to keep a bladder diary and our urogynecology specialists will complete the following:

  • Medical history
  • Physical exam
  • Bladder assessment, to make sure you are emptying completely
  • Urine tests, to look for infection or other health conditions

You may or may not be asked to have bladder function testing called urodynamics.

  • Behavioral interventions: These interventions include specific exercises to strengthen your pelvic floor, manage fluid consumption, weight management, and retrain your bladder to reduce the number of urge or leaking episodes.
  • Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation:
    • ObGyn physical therapy: our in-house ObGyn physical therapy specialist offers a unique and personal service that include education and biofeedback. Telemedicine appointments are also available (video/audio) or a combination of telemedicine and in-clinic appointments.
    • Pelvic floor exercises: in-clinic and at-home training and education to teach you how to use your pelvic floor muscles correctly
  • Prescription medications: There are a number of medications available that research shows are effective in treating overactive bladder.

At the Center for Urinary and Pelvic Health, we use the latest OAB treatment options. Following a thorough healthy history and exam, our urogynecology and physical therapy team work with you to create a care plan and carefully evaluate your progress over time.

Office-based Procedures

  • Sacral neuromodulation and PTNS (posterior tibial nerve stimulation) are successful office-based procedures. These treatments target the communication problems between the brain and the nerves that control the bladder, leading it to contract all the time. They improve this communication and better control bladder contractions.
  • Botox: This treatment uses an injection to relax the bladder muscles and decreases bladder spasms. Botox may reduce symptoms for up to six months.

Surgical Treatment of OAB

OAB symptoms may be worsened by pelvic organ prolapse concerns that, when surgically corrected, lessen the OAB symptoms. If surgery is necessary, our urogynecologic surgeons perform surgery at the North Memorial Outpatient Surgery Center at Maple Grove Hospital and at North Memorial Medical Center.

Treatment for OAB may include medications and/or surgery. Each brings unique risks. Talk with our bladder health specialists about your questions and concerns.

Our bladder health specialists see women at our Center for Urinary and Pelvic Health in Plymouth. We also see women at our Maple Grove office.

Your bladder health specialist may first recommend non-surgical treatment or an office procedure.

If you have surgery, you will receive pain medication and receive detailed self-care instructions. You may need to avoid sex, heavy lifting, and vigorous physical activity for several days or weeks, depending on your surgery.

  • What is the cause of my OAB?
  • What lifestyle changes can I make?
  • How can an ObGyn physical therapist help?
  • How do I know if I am emptying my bladder properly?
  • Is there a link between OAB and pelvic floor strength?
  • What tests do you recommend? Why?
  • What treatment options are available to me?
  • Do I need to see a specialist?
Diagnosis

At the Center for Urinary and Pelvic Health, we diagnose OAB in several ways. You will be asked to keep a bladder diary and our urogynecology specialists will complete the following:

  • Medical history
  • Physical exam
  • Bladder assessment, to make sure you are emptying completely
  • Urine tests, to look for infection or other health conditions

You may or may not be asked to have bladder function testing called urodynamics.

Non-surgical Treatment of OAB
  • Behavioral interventions: These interventions include specific exercises to strengthen your pelvic floor, manage fluid consumption, weight management, and retrain your bladder to reduce the number of urge or leaking episodes.
  • Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation:
    • ObGyn physical therapy: our in-house ObGyn physical therapy specialist offers a unique and personal service that include education and biofeedback. Telemedicine appointments are also available (video/audio) or a combination of telemedicine and in-clinic appointments.
    • Pelvic floor exercises: in-clinic and at-home training and education to teach you how to use your pelvic floor muscles correctly
  • Prescription medications: There are a number of medications available that research shows are effective in treating overactive bladder.
Office Procedures and Surgical Options for OAB

At the Center for Urinary and Pelvic Health, we use the latest OAB treatment options. Following a thorough healthy history and exam, our urogynecology and physical therapy team work with you to create a care plan and carefully evaluate your progress over time.

Office-based Procedures

  • Sacral neuromodulation and PTNS (posterior tibial nerve stimulation) are successful office-based procedures. These treatments target the communication problems between the brain and the nerves that control the bladder, leading it to contract all the time. They improve this communication and better control bladder contractions.
  • Botox: This treatment uses an injection to relax the bladder muscles and decreases bladder spasms. Botox may reduce symptoms for up to six months.

Surgical Treatment of OAB

OAB symptoms may be worsened by pelvic organ prolapse concerns that, when surgically corrected, lessen the OAB symptoms. If surgery is necessary, our urogynecologic surgeons perform surgery at the North Memorial Outpatient Surgery Center at Maple Grove Hospital and at North Memorial Medical Center.

Understanding Risks

Treatment for OAB may include medications and/or surgery. Each brings unique risks. Talk with our bladder health specialists about your questions and concerns.

Where We Treat Overactive Bladder

Our bladder health specialists see women at our Center for Urinary and Pelvic Health in Plymouth. We also see women at our Maple Grove office.

What to Expect

Your bladder health specialist may first recommend non-surgical treatment or an office procedure.

If you have surgery, you will receive pain medication and receive detailed self-care instructions. You may need to avoid sex, heavy lifting, and vigorous physical activity for several days or weeks, depending on your surgery.

Questions to Ask Your Provider
  • What is the cause of my OAB?
  • What lifestyle changes can I make?
  • How can an ObGyn physical therapist help?
  • How do I know if I am emptying my bladder properly?
  • Is there a link between OAB and pelvic floor strength?
  • What tests do you recommend? Why?
  • What treatment options are available to me?
  • Do I need to see a specialist?
“Our success with the overactive bladder or 'gotta go, gotta go' patients is amazing. No matter what your problem is with bladder concerns, we are able to help you take back your life.”
– Matthew Palmer, MD Bladder Health Specialist

Our team is committed to helping you be and stay healthy.
Call 763-587-7000 or book online today.

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